LIME Connection VIII –  Pouhine Poutama: Embedding Indigenous Health Education

The eighth biennial Leaders in Indigenous Medical Education (LIME) Network LIME Connection was held in Õtautahi (Christchurch), Aotearoa/New Zealand in 2019. The event was hosted by The University of Otago Christchurch.

This years’ theme; Pouhine Poutama: Embedding Indigenous Health Education was developed by host university representatives Associate Professor Suzanne Pitama and Ms Tania Huria, who sought the support of Te Marino Lenihan (Ngāi Tūāhuriri, Ngati Huirapa, Ngait Huikai).

The conference provided the sharing of knowledge and ways to improve Indigenous health outcomes through strengths based presentations. LIME Connection provides the space for robust discussion on leadership, curriculum innovation and collaboration in Indigenous health and health professional education. It provides an opportunity to celebrate successes and share new and evidenced-based approaches in the field.

LIME Connection is a leading international event in Indigenous health and health professional education for academics, students, community members, practitioners and policy makers. Speakers will include Indigenous and non-Indigenous experts from Australia, Aotearoa/New Zealand, Hawaii, Canada and further afield.

LIME Connection is held under the auspices of Medical Deans Australia and New Zealand, the Australian Indigenous Doctors’ Association (AIDA) and Te Ohu Rata O Aotearoa (Te ORA) Māori Medical Practitioners Association.

Day one of LIME Connection VIII saw delegates welcomed onto Ōnuku Marae for a beautiful cultural experience. Ōnuku Marae is set in the scenic Akaroa Harbour and is a place that represents the founding spirit of the past and nourishes our spirit and enriches our lives. delegates were able to share culture, stories, history and kai.

The remainder LIME Connection days were held at The Piano Centre for Music and Arts, which provided delegates with opportunities to network, share and learn from each other. Keynote speakers were a conference highlight – sharing their personal experiences and knowledge.

This year the University of Otago provided special helpers, the ‘LIME Squad’. They assisted with everything from cultural mentors, waiata singers, waiters, advisers, chaperones, conference phone app experts, supporters and presenters.

 

Keynote Speakers

Luke Pearson – IndigenousX

Dr Nadine Caron – University of Northern British Columbia

Dr Moana Jackson – Te Hau Tikanga, The Māori Law Commission

 

LIMElight Awards 2019

The LIMElight Awards are given in recognition of the significant and outstanding work staff, students and medical schools undertake in the teaching and learning of Indigenous health in medical education and Indigenous student recruitment and graduation.

For more information on each of the winners click here.

Award

Winner

Excellence in Community Engagement

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Medicine Strategic Working Committee

College of Medicine and Dentistry, James Cook University

Sustained excellence in Indigenous Health Curriculum Implementation

The C3 Team (Cultural Competency Curriculum Development)

University of Hawaii, John A. Burns School of Medicine

Excellence in the Development of New and Innovative Indigenous Health Curriculum

Candice McKenzie and Joleen Ryan

School of Medicine, Deakin University

Sustained Excellence in Indigenous Student Recruitment, Support and Graduation

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Medical Students’ Selection Committee

James Cook University

Excellence in Developing New Indigenous Student Recruitment, Support and Graduation Initiatives

Indigenous Engagement Team, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University & Danielle Soucy, Director, Indigenous Students Health Sciences Program, McMaster University

Excellence in Indigenous Student Recruitment, Support and Graduation

MAPAS – the Māori and Pacific Admission Scheme, The University of Auckland

Excellence in Indigenous Health Education Research

MIHI-Māori Indigenous Health Institute, University of Otago & Dr Rhys Jones, University of Auckland 

Excellence in Indigenous Health Education Student Leadership

Chayce Glass, University of Otago & DejaAnne Clanton, University of Notre Dame Fremantle

Excellence in Indigenous Health Education Leadership

Miriam Cavanagh

University of Notre Dame Australia, Sydney

 

Indigenous Medical Student and Community Member Bursaries

Since 2009, Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and Māori medical students and community members have been supported to participate in LIME Connection conferences via funded bursaries.

Bursary were awarded to those who are:

  • of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander or Māori descent
  • a current student enrolled in medical studies at an Australian or Aotearoa/New Zealand University (Students only);
  • a student member or agree to register as a member of the Australian Indigenous Doctors’ Association (AIDA) or Te ORA (Students only)
  • actively involved in working with a Medical School (community members only).

Bursaries were awarded on the recommendation of a selection committee and were based on specific selection criteria. The bursary covers the costs of airfares, accommodation, meals, conference registration and networking events.

This year the student bursary was funded by 17 different medical schools across Aotearoa and Australia and supported 31 bursary positions including 9 from Aotearoa and 23 from Australia, with many of the bursaries involved as presenters and participants.

 

Feedback

“The three keynote speakers were absolutely amazing! beautiful and thought provoking”

“Attending the Marae was an eye opener, and seeing the respect, connection was amazing. The discussions and presenters on the entire day was something I won’t forget.”

“The opportunity to meet, talk and share with first Nations people from around Australia and New Zealand is the best way of learning from each other to create a more welcoming and vibrant place for First Nations students on Campuses.”

“This is an amazing conference, well organised and very fitting for indigenous people. The wairua (spiritual feeling) of the event was very positive and tīkanga Māori that was followed made it even more outstanding. Great job to all those involved in the organising.”